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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Oct;25(10):1532-6.

Early body mass index and other anthropometric relationships between parents and children.

Author information

1
Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine Program, Stanford, California 94305-5722, USA. dlsafer@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess longitudinally the relationship between measures of adiposity in children over the first 8 y of life with that of their parents and to explore the role of parental adiposity in the development of childhood adiposity.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal study of measures of adiposity in children.

SUBJECTS:

A community sample from three health service systems including 114 children followed annually from infancy to age 8 and their 228 biological parents.

METHODS:

Measurements were assessed at baseline for parents (6 months post-partum for mothers) and at regular intervals for children beginning at age 2 months. Measurements included weight, height, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, midarm circumference, waist and hip.

RESULTS:

The major findings were: (1) significant correlations between parental body mass index (BMI), both maternal and paternal, and their biological offspring first emerged at age 7; (2) children with two overweight parents had consistently elevated BMI compared to children with either no overweight parents or one overweight parent. These differences became significant beginning at age 7.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports the hypothesis that familial factors (biological and/or environmental) affecting the development of adiposity emerge at specific ages and are related to the adiposity of both parents.

PMID:
11673777
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0801786
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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