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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Nov;55(11):1016-21.

High-fat and low-fat phenotypes: habitual eating of high- and low-fat foods not related to taste preference for fat.

Author information

1
BioPsychology Group, School of Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. JohnC@psychology.leeds.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize taste preferences in habitual high fat (HF) and low fat (LF) phenotypes.

DESIGN:

Eighteen test solutions to taste for each subject group in a fully repeated 2x6x3 measures design.

SETTING:

The Human Appetite Research Unit at Leeds University, Psychology Department.

SUBJECTS:

Eight lean HF (mean percentage fat intake 43.4% daily energy) and eight lean LF (mean percentage fat intake 32.7% daily energy) were recruited from the staff/student population of Leeds University.

INTERVENTIONS:

All subjects were required to taste 18 solutions based on six levels of fat content and three levels of sucrose content. Subjects rated each solution for fat content, sweetness and pleasantness.

RESULTS:

HF and LF showed significant effect for the fat content of the solution on the perception of creaminess (P<0.000), and sugar content on the perception of sweetness (P<0.000). HF and LF did not differ in their taste preferences and no preferred level of fat or sweetness was detected in either group.

CONCLUSIONS:

In young adult males, habitual food selection is not related to taste preference.

SPONSORSHIP:

This study was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

PMID:
11641752
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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