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Gastroenterology. 2001 Oct;121(4):900-7.

A preliminary trial of high-dose ursodeoxycholic acid in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

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1
Department of Gastroenterology, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, England, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) for which it has a positive effect on laboratory values, may delay the development of liver failure and prolong the transplant-free disease period. Standard doses of UDCA (8-15 mg/kg daily) have been shown to be ineffective in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We report on the findings (clinical, biochemical, histological, and cholangiographic) and side effects of a 2-year double-blind placebo-controlled preliminary study of high-dose UDCA in PSC patients.

METHODS:

Twenty-six patients with PSC were randomized to high-dose (20 mg/kg daily) UDCA or placebo. Cholangiography and liver biopsy were performed at entry and after 2 years. Symptoms, clinical signs, and liver biochemical tests were recorded at 3 monthly intervals.

RESULTS:

High-dose UDCA did not influence symptoms, but there was a significant improvement in liver biochemistry (serum alkaline phosphatase, P = 0.03; gamma-glutamyl transferase, P = 0.01) and a significant reduction in progression in cholangiographic appearances (P = 0.015) and liver fibrosis as assessed by disease staging (P = 0.05). In the treatment group, a significant increase in total bile acids and saturation with UDCA >70% confirmed patient compliance. No significant side effects were reported.

CONCLUSIONS:

High-dose UDCA may be of clinical benefit in PSC, but trials with a larger number of participants and of longer duration are required to establish whether the effect of high-dose UDCA on liver biochemistry, histology, and cholangiography in patients with PSC is translated into improved long-term survival.

PMID:
11606503
DOI:
10.1053/gast.2001.27965
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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