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BMC Infect Dis. 2001;1:17. Epub 2001 Sep 25.

Cellulose acetate phthalate, a common pharmaceutical excipient, inactivates HIV-1 and blocks the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120.

Author information

1
Biochemical Virology Laboratory, The Lindsley F Kimball Research Institute of the New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10021, USA. arneurath@worldnet.att.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), a pharmaceutical excipient used for enteric film coating of capsules and tablets, was shown to inhibit infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and several herpesviruses. CAP formulations inactivated HIV-1, herpesvirus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) and the major nonviral sexually transmitted disease (STD) pathogens and were effective in animal models for vaginal infection by HSV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus.

METHODS:

Enzyme-linked immunoassays and flow cytometry were used to demonstrate CAP binding to HIV-1 and to define the binding site on the virus envelope.

RESULTS:

1) CAP binds to HIV-1 virus particles and to the envelope glycoprotein gp120; 2) this leads to blockade of the gp120 V3 loop and other gp120 sites resulting in diminished reactivity with HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5; 3) CAP binding to HIV-1 virions impairs their infectivity; 4) these findings apply to both HIV-1 IIIB, an X4 virus, and HIV-1 BaL, an R5 virus.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results provide support for consideration of CAP as a topical microbicide of choice for prevention of STDs, including HIV-1 infection.

PMID:
11602021
PMCID:
PMC57811
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2334-1-17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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