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J Pediatr. 2001 Oct;139(4):494-500.

Resistance training and bone mineral density in adolescent females.

Author information

1
Institute for Women's Health, Texas Woman's University, Denton, Texas 76204, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of 15 months of resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD) in female adolescents (aged 14 to 17 years).

STUDY DESIGN:

Participants were randomly assigned to either a training (n = 46) or control group (n = 21). BMD and body composition were measured by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Strength was assessed by means of one-repetition maximums for the leg press and bench press. The exercise group trained 30 to 45 minutes a day, 3 days per week, using 15 different resistance exercises. Control participants remained sedentary (<2 hours of exercise per week).

RESULTS:

Leg strength increased significantly (40%) in the exercise group, but there were no changes in the control group. Femoral neck BMD increased significantly in the training group (1.035 to 1.073 g/cm(2), P <.01) but not in the control group (1.034 to 1.048 g/cm(2)). No significant changes were seen in either group in lumbar spine BMD (1.113 to 1.142 g/cm(2) and 1.158 to 1.190 g/cm(2), respectively) or total body BMD (1.103 to 1.134 g/cm(2) and 1.111 to 1.129 g/cm(2), respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Resistance training is a potential method for increasing bone density in adolescents, although such a program would be best done as part of the school curriculum.

PMID:
11598594
DOI:
10.1067/mpd.2001.116698
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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