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J Hepatol. 2001 Sep;35(3):367-75.

Transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking is involved in the stabilization of extracellular matrix in human liver fibrosis.

Author information

1
Institut Pasteur de Lyon, France. grenardp@cardiff.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Lysyl oxidase-mediated cross-linking contributes to the stabilization of collagen in liver fibrosis. We have investigated transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking, to determine if it participates in the stabilization of extracellular matrix in human liver fibrosis.

METHODS:

Transglutaminase activity was assessed in vitro by incorporation of biotinylated amine into liver proteins. The product of the transglutaminase-catalyzed cross-linking reaction, Nepsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine, and the extracellular proteins cross-linked by it, were localized by immunohistochemistry in fibrotic livers. The cross-linked complexes were extracted from liver tissue, immunopurified and characterized by Western blot.

RESULTS:

Transglutaminase, detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and by enzymatic activity, was found in higher amounts in fibrotic than in normal liver. The Nepsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine cross-link, undetectable in normal liver, was present extracellularly in fibrotic liver, where it was co-distributed with osteonectin, mostly in inflammatory areas submitted to an intense remodeling. Cross-linking of osteonectin by transglutaminase was confirmed by Western blot. In parasitic fibrosis transglutaminase also originates from the parasite.

CONCLUSIONS:

Transglutaminase-mediated cross-linking occurs in liver extracellular matrix during the early, inflammatory, stage of liver fibrosis, whereas cross-linking by pyridinoline occurs mostly later in the fibrotic process. This could lead to the development of new anti-fibrotic treatments targeted to a specific stage of fibrosis.

PMID:
11592598
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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