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Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):943-8.

Respiratory infections in infants: interaction of parental allergy, child care, and siblings-- The PIAMA study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. koopman@alkg.azr.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between contacts with other children and the development of respiratory infections in the first year of life in children with or without genetic predisposition for allergy.

METHODS:

Children (n = 4146) who participate in a prospective birth cohort study (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy study) were investigated. Questionnaires were used to obtain information on doctor-diagnosed upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), child care attendance, having siblings, family history of allergic disease, and various potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Child care attendance in the first year of life was associated with doctor-diagnosed URTI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.1-3.4 for large child care facility vs no child care) and doctor-diagnosed LRTI (AOR: 5.6; 95% CI: 3.9-7.9). Having siblings was associated with doctor-diagnosed LRTI (AOR: 2.6; 95% CI: 2.0-3.4). In addition, children who have allergic parents and attend child care or have older siblings have a higher risk of developing doctor-diagnosed LRTI than do children who have nonallergic parents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Child care attendance or having siblings increases the risk of developing doctor-diagnosed LRTI in the first year of life to a greater extent in allergy-prone children than in children who are not allergy prone.

PMID:
11581448
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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