Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Res Bull. 2001 Jul 15;55(5):641-50.

Application of cDNA microarrays to examine gene expression differences in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Section on Plasticity and Development, Cellular Neurobiology Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. mvawter@uci.edu

Abstract

Using cDNA microarrays we have investigated gene expression patterns in brain regions of patients with schizophrenia. A cDNA neuroarray, comprised of genes related to brain function, was used to screen pools of samples from the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex from a matched set of subjects, and middle temporal gyrus, from a separate subject cohort. Samples of cerebellum and prefrontal cortex from neuroleptic naive patients were also included. Genes that passed a 3% reproducibility criterion for differential expression in independent experiments included 21 genes for drug-treated patients and 5 genes for drug-naive patients. Of these 26 genes, 10 genes were increased and 16 were decreased. Many of the differentially expressed genes were related to synaptic signaling and proteolytic functions. A smaller number of these genes were also differentially expressed in the middle temporal gyrus. The five genes that were differentially expressed in two brain regions from separate cohorts are: tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide; sialyltransferase; proteasome subunit, alpha type 1; ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1; and solute carrier family 10, member 1. Identification of patterns of changes in gene expression may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia disorders.

PMID:
11576761
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center