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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Sep;25(9):1322-6.

Weight gain and adipose tissue metabolism after smoking cessation in women.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Medicine, USA. cindy@grecc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, and is an important preventable cause of death and illness. One major deterrent to smoking cessation is a gain in body weight. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to this weight gain may maximize the success of long-term smoking cessation. We hypothesized that smoking cessation is associated with an increase in adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (AT-LPL) activity and/or a decrease in lipolysis, two metabolic factors that determine the balance between fat storage and fat utilization, and thus affect the propensity for weight gain.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Ten premenopausal women (37.1+/-6.2 y, 31.7+/-6.4 kg/m(2) body mass index (BMI), mean+/-s.d.) participated in a 4 week smoking cessation program. Measurements of body weight, waist and hip circumferences, adipose cell metabolism and resting metabolic rate were obtained at baseline and after 4 weeks of smoking cessation.

RESULTS:

Of the 10 women who began the intervention, five successfully completed the smoking cessation intervention. After 4 weeks of smoking cessation, there were significant increases in body weight (95.1+/-13.9-97.7+/-14.4 kg, P<0.05), with no change in waist and hip circumferences or resting energy expenditure. Gluteal AT-LPL activity significantly increased in all women by 2.8-fold (1.65+/-1.30-4.72+/-3.34 nmol/g/min, P<0.05). Abdominal AT-LPL activity increased in four out of the five women, but did not reach statistical significance (1.14+/-0.88-3.50+/-3.76 nmol/g/min, P=0.14). The increase in body weight correlated with the increase in gluteal AT-LPL activity (r=0.89, P<0.05), as well as the baseline activity of gluteal AT-LPL (r=0.86, P=0.06). There were no changes in basal or stimulated lipolysis in the gluteal or abdominal fat depots.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that smoking cessation is associated with significant increases in body weight, as well as changes in adipose cell metabolism, in particular increases in AT-LPL activity. This increase in LPL activity may contribute to the increase in body weight associated with smoking cessation.

PMID:
11571594
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0801716
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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