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J Bacteriol. 2001 Oct;183(20):5848-54.

Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium swarming mutants with altered biofilm-forming abilities: surfactin inhibits biofilm formation.

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1
Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA.

Abstract

Swarming motility plays an important role in surface colonization by several flagellated bacteria. Swarmer cells are specially adapted to rapidly translocate over agar surfaces by virtue of their more numerous flagella, longer cell length, and encasement of slime. The external slime provides the milieu for motility and likely harbors swarming signals. We recently reported the isolation of swarming-defective transposon mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a large majority of which were defective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis. Here, we have examined the biofilm-forming abilities of the swarming mutants using a microtiter plate assay. A whole spectrum of efficiencies were observed, with LPS mutants being generally more proficient than wild-type organisms in biofilm formation. Since we have postulated that O-antigen may serve a surfactant function during swarming, we tested the effect of the biosurfactant surfactin on biofilm formation. We report that surfactin inhibits biofilm formation of wild-type S. enterica grown either in polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells or in urethral catheters. Other bio- and chemical surfactants tested had similar effects.

PMID:
11566982
PMCID:
PMC99661
DOI:
10.1128/JB.183.20.5848-5854.2001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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