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Chang Gung Med J. 2001 Jul;24(7):431-9.

Short- and long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 222, Mai-Chin Road, Keelung, Taiwan, R.O.C. fangping@cgmh.org.tw

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The beneficial effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on cardiovascular disease has been documented in postmenopausal women, but has a significant time trend. Thus, it is worthwhile to further study whether there are different effects on cardiovascular factors between short- and long-term use of HRT.

METHOD:

Prospective study of the changes on lipoprotein profile, hemostatic factors, and platelet aggregation was evaluated in 21 postmenopausal women receiving oral E2 valerate (2 mg/d) combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (10 mg/d) during the last 10 days of each 21-day cycle. The treatment period was 24 months.

RESULTS:

During the 24 months of treatment, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and atherogenic indices- total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-C-to-HDL-C, were significantly reduced. The concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were significantly reduced after 12 months of HRT. In addition, the concentrations of antithrombin III were significantly increased, but protein S was statistically decreased during the 18 months of HRT. The maximum aggregation and slope of platelet aggregation were significantly reduced only during the first 12 months of HRT.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrates that there were some differences in cardiovascular risk factors between short- and long-term HRT, especially in changes in platelet aggregation and hemostatic factors. However, the long-term favorable effect on lipoprotein metabolism and fibrinolytic activity among hormone users may explain, in part, the inverse association between HRT and cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
11565249
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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