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Appetite. 2001 Aug;37(1):71-9.

Lifestyle factors affecting fruit and vegetable consumption in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Nutrition Epidemiology Group, Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds, UK. hssjep@leeds.ac.uk

Abstract

The UK Women's Cohort Study (UKWCS) was originally set up to look at morbidity and mortality data on subjects with a wide range of dietary intakes including vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, non-red meat eaters and red meat eaters. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors that affect fruit and vegetable consumption within this particular cohort of women. Females of ages 35-69 years, taking part in the UK Women's Cohort Study (N=35 367), provided health and lifestyle information including a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. In multiple logistic regression, the strongest predictors of a higher reported level of fruit and vegetable consumption were being a vegetarian or vegan, taking vitamin or mineral supplements, being married, educated to A-level or degree level and belonging to a higher socio-economic group. Conversely, smokers were found to be only half as likely as non-smokers to be high fruit and vegetable consumers. These lifestyle distinctions among three levels of reported fruit and vegetable consumption are relevant to the future targeting of health promotion strategies.

PMID:
11562159
DOI:
10.1006/appe.2001.0415
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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