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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2001 Sep;125(3):253-60.

A study of the effect of nasal steroid sprays in perennial allergic rhinitis patients with rhinitis medicamentosa.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Eye and Ear Institute and the Department of Otolaryngology, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. bjferg@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if rebound congestion can be reduced with concomitant nasal steroid spray usage.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

Randomized, double blind, controlled single center study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty subjects with perennial allergic rhinitis with nasal congestion.

INTERVENTION:

All subjects received 3 weeks of twice-daily oxymetazoline. After 2 weeks, subjects were randomized to 2 additional weeks of concomitant budesonide aqueous nasal spray (n = 9) or placebo (n = 10). In the sixth week, all sprays were stopped.

RESULTS:

Both groups showed subjective and objective evidence of rebound congestion 24 hours after cessation of oxymetazoline (P < 0.05). Subjective rebound congestion resolved in 48 hours in the budesonide aqueous nasal spray group but persisted for over 1 week in the placebo group.

CONCLUSION:

Rebound congestion is objectively present in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis after 3 weeks of oxymetazoline spray. Rebound congestion is reduced by concomitant budesonide aqueous nasal spray use.

SIGNIFICANCE:

This study supports the common clinical practice of nasal steroid sprays to ameliorate rebound congestion concomitant with and after cessation of topical decongestant sprays.

PMID:
11555762
DOI:
10.1067/mhn.2001.117717
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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