Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2001 Aug;49(8):1086-92.

Comparative impact of hearing and vision impairment on subsequent functioning.

Author information

1
Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to compare independent impacts of two levels of self-reported hearing and vision impairment on subsequent disability, physical functioning, mental health, and social functioning.

DESIGN:

A 1-year prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

San Francisco Bay Area, California.

PARTICIPANTS:

Two thousand four hundred forty-two community-dwelling men and women age 50 to 102 from the Alameda County Study (California).

MEASUREMENTS:

Hearing and vision impairment were assessed in 1994. Outcomes, measured in 1995, included physical disability (activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, physical performance, mobility, and lack of participation in activities), mental health (self-assessed, major depressive episode), and social functioning (feeling left out, feeling lonely, hard to feel close to others, inability to pay attention). All 1995 outcomes were adjusted for baseline 1994 values.

RESULTS:

Both impairments had strong independent impacts on subsequent functioning. Vision impairment exerted a more wide-ranging impact on functional status, ranging from physical disability to social functioning. However, the results also highlighted the importance of hearing impairment, even when mild.

CONCLUSIONS:

These impairments can be partially ameliorated through prevention, assessment, and treatment strategies. Greater attention to sensory impairments by clinicians, patients, public health advocates, and researchers is needed to enhance functioning in older adults.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for MLibrary (Deep Blue)
Loading ...
Support Center