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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Sep;82(9):1286-90.

Hygiene problems of residual limb and silicone liners in transtibial amputees wearing the total surface bearing socket.

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1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi, Kitakyushu, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether washing the residual limb and silicone liner reduces the associated skin problems in transtibial amputees who wear a total surface bearing (TSB) socket.

DESIGN:

Case series.

SETTING:

General community.

PATIENTS:

Eighty-three transtibial amputees (65 men, 18 women; mean age, 53.4 yr) in western Japan who used or had used a TSB socket with a silicone liner in the previous 5 years.

INTERVENTION:

Participants took a self-administered questionnaire that included items concerning their personal profile, daily life activities, period of TSB use (yr), hours of TSB use daily, washing frequency of the residual limb and silicone liner, the method of washing, and any associated hygiene problems.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Logistic regression analysis was applied to examine factors related to hygiene problems. Predicted values include hygiene problems (perspiration, eruptions, itching, odor) and explanatory values include TSB use, daily life activity, and washing of limb and prosthetic.

RESULTS:

Fifty-five subjects washed the residual limb, and 44 subjects washed the silicone liner every day. Itching, perspiration, eruption, and odor were frequent hygiene problems. Perspiration was noted less by women, eruption more by older subjects, and itching and odor more by younger subjects. Washing the silicone liner every day was associated with fewer reports of skin eruption.

CONCLUSION:

Keeping the residual limb and silicone liner clean is important to reduce skin problems, but hygiene problems of the residual limb and silicone liner still remain to be resolved.

PMID:
11552206
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2001.25154
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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