Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Sep;82(9):1226-9.

Maggot débridement therapy in outpatients.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4800, USA. Rsherman@UCI.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify the benefits, risks, and problems associated with outpatient maggot therapy.

DESIGN:

Descriptive case series, with survey.

SETTING:

Urban and rural clinics and homes.

PARTICIPANTS:

Seven caregivers with varying levels of formal health care training and 21 ambulatory patients (15 men, 6 women; average age, 63 yr) with nonhealing wounds.

INTERVENTION:

Maggot therapy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Therapists' opinions concerning clinical outcomes and the disadvantages of therapy.

RESULTS:

More than 95% of the therapists and 90% of their patients were satisfied with their outpatient maggot débridement therapy. Of the 8 patients who were advised to undergo amputation or major surgical débridement as an alternative to maggot débridement, only 3 required surgical resection (amputation) after maggot therapy. Maggot therapy completely or significantly débrided 18 (86%) of the wounds; 11 healed without any additional surgical procedures. There was anxiety about maggots escaping, but actual escapes were rare. Pain, reported by several patients, was controlled with oral analgesics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Outpatient maggot débridement is safe, effective, and acceptable to most patients, even when administered by nonphysicians. Maggot débridement is a valuable and rational treatment option for many ambulatory, home-bound, and extended care patients who have nonhealing wounds.

PMID:
11552195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center