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J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Aug;27(8):1238-42.

Traumatic wound dehiscence after cataract extraction.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study the visual outcome and factors associated with it in patients with traumatic dehiscence of a cataract surgery wound.

SETTING:

Department of Ophthalmology and the Brown School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

METHODS:

A retrospective observational study of 37 eyes of 37 consecutive patients with traumatic wound dehiscence of a cataract surgery wound was conducted. A complete ophthalmic evaluation was performed in all patients. Statistical analysis was done to identify factors associated with the best corrected visual acuity at the end of follow-up.

RESULTS:

Patients had extracapsular cataract extraction (n = 29), intracapsular cataract extraction (n = 4), or lensectomy (n = 4). No patient had phacoemulsification via a small incision. A univariate analysis showed that factors associated with a worse visual outcome included the presence at presentation of hyphema (P = .05), intraocular lens dislocation or loss (P = .006), vitreous hemorrhage (P = .0002), scleral rupture (P = .001), a long interval from surgery to trauma (P < .0001), and fall as the cause of trauma (P < .0001). In a multivariate model, only a surgery-to-trauma interval longer than 8 weeks was associated with a worse visual outcome (P < .0001). Visual acuity immediately after trauma was a poor predictor of final visual acuity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Visual outcome after traumatic wound dehiscence of a cataract surgery wound was strongly associated with the interval from surgery to trauma. Other factors were less reliable predictors of visual outcome. Traumatic wound dehiscence only moderately affected visual outcome after cataract surgery in most cases.

PMID:
11524196
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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