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J Pathol. 1975 Feb;115(2):81-9.

Experimental bacterial endocarditis. IV. Structure and evolution of very early lesions.

Abstract

The vegetations of experimental sterile and bacterial endocarditis in rabbits were studied using light, immunofluorescent and electron microscopy. At an early stage, both lesions were composed chiefly of masses of platelets supported in a scaffolding of fibrin strands. In previous studies, this structure has often been described merely as "fibrin". After i.v. injection of Thorotrast, sterile vegetations showed remarkable accumulations of mononuclear phagocytes containing this substance, on surfaces projecting into the bloodstream. Sections fixed 30 min. after i.v. injection of streptococci also showed these phagocytes, which contained large numbers of bacteria. The possibility that BE is initiated by phagocytosis of circulating bacteria has been raised. Smaller numbers of circulating streptococci reached the vegetation by direct adhesion to exposed surfaces. In contrast, a majority of Proteus and Staphylococcus albus adhered directly to vegetations, without phagocytosis. Subsequently, these first settlers multiplied rapidly to form rounded colonies surrounded by capsules of fibrin, which apparently provided protection from phagocytosis. The vegetations grew by accretion of layers of fibrin and platelets, with colonies sandwiched between them. This suggested that a cycle of thrombosis and reseeding by circulating bacteria was a factor in their growth. Colonies showed morphological changes consistent with ageing after two days. Healing occurred by endothelialisation and organisation, and was greatly accelerated by penicillin treatment.

PMID:
1151519
DOI:
10.1002/path.1711150204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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