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Am J Public Health. 2001 Aug;91(8):1251-3.

Black-white differences in infectious disease mortality in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Postbox 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands. richardus@mgz.fgg.eur.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study determined the degree to which Black-White differences in infectious disease mortality are explained by income and education and the extent to which infectious diseases contribute to Black-White differences in all-cause mortality.

METHODS:

A sample population of the National Longitudinal Mortality Study from 1979 through 1981 was analyzed and followed up through 1989.

RESULTS:

Infectious disease mortality among Blacks was higher than among Whites, with a relative risk of 1.53 after adjustment for age and sex and 1.34 after further adjustment for income and education. Death from infectious diseases contributed to 9.3% of the difference in all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the United States, infectious diseases account for nearly 10% of the excess all-cause mortality rates in Blacks compared with Whites.

PMID:
11499113
PMCID:
PMC1446755
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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