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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2001 Aug 15;26(16):E354-60.

Transpedicular wedge osteotomy for correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis: experience with 78 patients.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedics, Tzu-Chi Medical Center, Hua-lien, Taiwan. db0077@tzuchi.com.tw

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a retrospective study of surgical correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis.

OBJECTIVE:

To report the surgical results of thoracolumbar kyphosis deformity corrected with transpedicular wedge osteotomy performed by a single surgeon at a university hospital.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

There has not been a large series in the literature reporting on results of the Thomasen-type closing wedge osteotomy for correction of kyphosis deformity secondary to ankylosing spondylitis, nor has two-level osteotomy of this type in one patient ever been described.

METHODS:

From 1991 through 1998, 92 transpedicular wedge osteotomies were performed in 78 patients with ankylosing spondylitis for correction of fixed flexion deformity of the thoracolumbar spine.

RESULTS:

The mean amount of correction for each level of osteotomy was 34.5 degrees (range, 15 degrees -60 degrees ). The largest amount of overall correction for a single patient was 100 degrees. Most of the osteotomies (64 of 92) were done at L2 and L3. Fourteen patients with severe deformity required staged two-level osteotomy. Excellent and good results were obtained in 77 patients (98.7%) at the final follow-up. There was no mortality, nor were there any major neurological complications.

CONCLUSIONS:

Transpedicular wedge osteotomy can effectively and safely correct kyphotic deformity of the thoracolumbar spine caused by ankylosing spondylitis, regardless of rigidity of the spinal curves. Two-level osteotomy can provide sufficient correction for severe cases.

PMID:
11493864
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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