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Surgery. 2001 Aug;130(2):198-203.

Phospholipase A(2)--derived neutral lipids from posthemorrhagic shock mesenteric lymph prime the neutrophil oxidative burst.

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1
Department of Surgery, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Colorado 80204, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our previous work identified posthemorrhagic shock mesenteric lymph (PHSML) lipids as key elements in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)--provoked acute lung injury. We hypothesize that gut phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) is responsible for the generation of proinflammatory lipids in PHSML that primes circulating PMNs for enhanced oxidative burst.

METHODS:

Mesenteric lymph was collected from rats (n = 5) before (preshock), during the induction of hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure, 40 mm Hg x 30 minutes), and at resuscitation (shed blood + 2x lactated Ringer's solution). PLA(2) inhibition (quinacrine, 10 mg/kg, intravenously) was given before shock was induced. Extracted lipids were separated by normal phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and resuspended in albumin. PMNs were exposed to a 5% vol:vol concentration of eluted lipids and activated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (1 micromol/L). Superoxide production was assessed by cytochrome C reduction.

RESULTS:

High-pressure liquid chromatography--extracted neutral lipids of lymph collected before hemorrhagic shock did not prime the PMN oxidase, whereas isolated neutral lipids of postshock lymph primed PMNs 2.6- +/- 0.32-fold above baseline (P <.05). PLA(2) inhibition returned PHSML neutral lipid priming to baseline levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

PLA(2) inhibition before hemorrhagic shock abrogates the neutrophil priming effects of PHSML through reduction of the accumulation of proinflammatory neutral lipids. Identification of these PLA(2)-dependent lipids provides a mechanistic link that may have therapeutic implications for postshock acute lung injury.

PMID:
11490349
DOI:
10.1067/msy.2001.115824
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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