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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001 Jul;33(1):64-9.

Thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, and vitamin C status in premature infants receiving parenteral and enteral nutrition.

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1
Department of Biochemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 3X9, Canada. jfriel@morgan.ucs.mun.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a paucity of data about water soluble vitamin status in low birthweight infants. Therefore, the authors' objective was to assess current feeding protocols.

METHODS:

The authors measured serum concentrations for riboflavin, pyridoxine, and vitamin C and functional assays for thiamine and riboflavin longitudinally in 16 premature infants (birthweight, 1,336 +/- 351 g; gestational age, 30 +/- 2.5 weeks) before receiving nutrition (time 1, 2 +/- 1 days), during supplemental or parenteral nutrition (time 2, 16 +/- 10 days) and while receiving full oral feedings (time 3, 32 +/- 15 days). In plasma, vitamin C was measured colorimetrically, and riboflavin and pyridoxine were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. The erythrocyte transketolase test as a functional evaluation of thiamine and the erythrocyte glutathione reductase test for riboflavin were measured colorimetrically.

RESULTS:

At time 1, nutrient intake of vitamins were negligible because infants were receiving intravenous glucose and electrolytes only. Intakes differed between time 2 and time 3 for thiamine (510 +/- 280 and 254 +/- 115 microg. kg-1. d-1, respectively), riboflavin (624 +/- 305 and 371 +/- 193 microg. kg-1. d-1, respectively), and pyridoxine (394 +/- 243 and 173 +/- 85 microg/100 kcal, respectively), but not for vitamin C (32 +/- 17 and 28 +/- 12 mg. kg-1. d-1, respectively). Blood levels at times 1, 2, and 3 were for thiamine (4.9 +/- 2.7%, 3.3 +/- 6.6%, and 4.1 +/- 9% erythrocyte transketolase test, respectively), riboflavin (0.91 +/- 0.31, 0.7 +/- 0.3, 0.91 +/- 0.18 erythrocyte glutathione reductase test, respectively), riboflavin (19.5 +/- 17, 23.3 +/- 8.6, 17.6 +/- 10 ng/mL, respectively), pyridoxine (32 +/- 25, 40 +/- 16, 37 +/- 26 ng/mL, respectively), and vitamin C (5.2 +/- 3, 5 +/- 2.2, 10 +/- 5 microg/mL, respectively) and did not differ at those times.

CONCLUSIONS:

Current intakes of these vitamins, except for possibly vitamin C, during parenteral and enteral nutrition seem to result in adequate plasma concentrations and normal functional indices.

PMID:
11479410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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