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Pediatr Res. 2001 Aug;50(2):190-5.

Impaired glucocorticoid synthesis in premature infants developing chronic lung disease.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, University of New Mexico, ACC 3-West, Albuquerque, NM 87131, U.S.A. kwatterberg@salud.unm.edu

Abstract

Premature infants have higher cortisol precursor concentrations than term infants; however, many sick preterm infants have surprisingly low cortisol concentrations. Those who develop chronic lung disease (CLD) have lower cortisol values than those who recover. We hypothesized that some infants have a decreased ability to synthesize cortisol, leading to physiologic disruptions including amplified inflammatory responses, thereby resulting in CLD. We measured cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and ACTH in 40 extremely low birth weight infants enrolled in a study of low-dose hydrocortisone therapy to prevent CLD. Thirty-four infants survived and 15 developed CLD. Hydrocortisone therapy did not suppress ACTH or any measured steroid value. Before study (<48 h of life), 17-OH progesterone was higher in CLD infants, as was the ratio of 17-OH progesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. On d 15-19 (> or =72 h after end of therapy), basal and stimulated cortisol concentrations were lower in CLD infants. In contrast, the basal ratio of 11-deoxycortisol to cortisol was higher in CLD infants, as were stimulated values of 17-OH progesterone and stimulated ratios of 17-OH progesterone to 11-deoxycortisol and 11-deoxycortisol to cortisol. Thus, infants who developed CLD had lower basal and stimulated cortisol values, but elevated cortisol precursors and precursor to product ratios, compared with infants who recovered. These data support the hypothesis that these immature infants have a decreased capacity to synthesize cortisol, which may lead to a relative adrenal insufficiency in the face of significant illness.

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