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Am J Cardiol. 2001 Aug 1;88(3):270-4.

Effect of niacin and atorvastatin on lipoprotein subclasses in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. jmckenney@ncrinc.net

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of atorvastatin and niacin on lipoprotein subfractions in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia. This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-design study of patients with total cholesterol >200 mg/dl, triglycerides between 200 and 800 mg/dl, and apolipoprotein B >110 mg/dl. Patients were randomly assigned to atorvastatin 10 mg or immediate release niacin 3,000 mg daily for 12 weeks following a low-fat diet stabilization period. Lipoprotein subclasses were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Atorvastatin and niacin both significantly reduced the concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles (-31% and -29%, respectively) and small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles (-44% and -35%, respectively). Niacin increased the concentration of large LDL (+75%). Atrovastatin reduced the number of LDL particles more than niacin (31% vs 14%). In patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia, both drugs had important effects on lipoprotein subfractions, which contributed to a reduction in coronary heart disease risk. The drugs equally reduced VLDL subclass levels. Niacin shifted the LDL subclass distribution toward the larger particles, more effectively converted patients from LDL phenotype B to phenotype A, and increased levels of the larger and perhaps more cardioprotective high-density lipoprotein particles. In contrast, atorvastatin preferentially lowered the concentration of small LDL particles without increasing levels of large LDL, and more effectively, reduced LDL particle numbers. Atorvastatin had a preferred LDL effect, whereas niacin had a preferred high-density lipoprotein effect.

PMID:
11472706
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9149(01)01639-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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