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Neuroimage. 2001 Aug;14(2):501-9.

In vivo short echo time 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the temporal lobes.

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1
The MRI Unit, University Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, Queen Square, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Two different methodologies for obtaining PRESS-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from the mesial and lateral temporal lobes were investigated. The study used short echo times (30 ms) and long repetition times (3000 ms) to minimize relaxation effects. Inhomogeneity and spectral distortions from the proximity of the temporal bones precluded the attainment of consistently good-quality data from both temporal lobes at once. Even when the right and left temporal lobes were studied separately, distortions often disturbed spectra from the anterior lateral temporal lobe. Quantitative analysis using LCModel was therefore performed only on the posterior lateral temporal lobe, and the posterior, middle, and anterior mesial temporal lobe. No significant left-right differences in metabolite content were found in a series of 10 controls. Significantly higher concentrations of myoinositol and choline were found in the anterior mesial temporal lobe, even when grey matter content was included as a covariate. The concentration of N-acetyl aspartate plus N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAc) was not found to vary significantly along the length of the hippocampus. The previously observed lower anterior ratios of NAA to creatine plus choline (NAA/(Cr + Cho) may instead have been due to higher anterior choline. Large differences in metabolite concentrations were seen between posterior lateral temporal lobe (predominantly subcortical white matter) and the posterior mesial temporal lobe, most notably lower creatine, glutamate/glutamine, and myo-inositol, and higher NAA/(Cr + Cho) in the lateral than mesial temporal lobe. This pattern was similar to that previously seen for grey/white matter differences in the frontal, parietal and occipital regions.

PMID:
11467922
DOI:
10.1006/nimg.2001.0827
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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