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AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2001 Aug;177(2):359-62.

Comparison of balloon- and mushroom-retained large-bore gastrostomy catheters.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, MC 2026, The University of Chicago Hospitals, 5841 S. Maryland Ave., Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate two different types of percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy procedures and catheters.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Between July 8, 1999, and August 4, 2000, 80 percutaneous gastrostomy catheters were placed in 80 patients in 80 attempts. Twenty-five 16-, 18-, or 20-French balloon-retained catheters and 55 20-French mushroom-retained catheters were inserted. Typically, the type of catheters placed was based on operator preference. However, balloon-retained tubes were preferred for use in patients with obstructive head and neck or esophageal malignancies, and mushroom-retained catheters were preferred for use in demented or combative patients. Follow-up was conducted through chart reviews and telephone interviews. The technical success, procedural complications, and catheter complications were recorded. Chi-square statistical analysis was performed.

RESULTS:

Technical success was 100% (80/80 patients), and no procedural complications occurred. In patients who received balloon-retained catheters, the major complication rate was 0%, the minor complication rate was 8% (2/25 patients), and the tube complication rate was 68% (17/25 patients). The following complications occurred: catheter dislodgment (n = 17), superficial cellulitis (n = 1), and bleeding gastric ulcer (n = 1). In patients who received mushroom-retained catheters, the major complication rate was 0%, the minor complication rate was 3.6% (2/55 patients), and the tube complication rate was 3.6% (2/55 patients). The following complications occurred: superficial cellulitis (n = 2), tube occlusion (n = 1), and peristomal tube leakage (n = 1). No significant differences in major or minor complications were found between the gastrostomy procedures. Balloon-retained catheters had a significantly higher rate of tube complications (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Compared with balloon-retained catheters, mushroom-retained gastrostomy catheters are significantly more durable, more secure, and less prone to tube dysfunction. Mushroom-retained catheters should be the preferred type of gastrostomy catheter to place in patients whenever possible.

PMID:
11461862
DOI:
10.2214/ajr.177.2.1770359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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