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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2001 Jul 1;26(13):E294-9.

A correlation between magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological findings in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

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  • 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Japan. kanchiku@mx5.tiki.ne.jp

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Correlation between compressed spinal cords on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electrophysiological findings in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients.

OBJECTIVE:

To clarify the correlation between spinal-cord-evoked potentials and MRI measurements of compressed spinal cords in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Compression of the spinal cord does not always cause clinical symptoms and it is difficult to infer the degree of dysfunction of the spinal cord from MRI findings.

METHODS:

Seventeen patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with MRI and spinal-cord-evoked potentials before surgery. Using abnormality in spinal-cord-evoked potentials as indicators of spinal cord morphology, spinal-cord transverse area and compression ratios (central and 1/4-lateral) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging. The correlations between these dimensions and electrophysiological findings were investigated.

RESULTS:

The mean preoperative transverse area of the spinal cord was 47.13 mm2. The mean preoperative central compression ratio of the spinal cord was 34.4%. The mean preoperative 1/4-lateral compression ratio of the spinal cord was 27.5%. A correlation (Spearman r=0.65, P < 0.01) was observed between the 1/4-lateral compression ratio of the spinal cord and the amplitude ratio of spinal-cord-evoked potentials after electric stimulation of the brain (Br(E)-SCEPs).

CONCLUSIONS:

The preoperative 1/4-lateral compression ratio of the spinal cord was found to reflect the degree of dysfunction of the corticospinal tracts.

PMID:
11458169
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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