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Cancer Causes Control. 2001 May;12(4):289-300.

The heterogeneity in risk factors of lung cancer and the difference of histologic distribution between genders in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Medicine, and School of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The difference in histologic patterns of lung cancer between men and women in Taiwan may be associated with the heterogeneity in causal factors of lung cancer between the sexes. A sex- and age-matched case-control study was designed to investigate such a relationship.

METHODS:

Cases consisted of 236 male and 291 female incident cases with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed primary carcinoma of the lung, and were compared to one or two individually matched controls.

RESULTS:

Cigarette smoking, occupations, and previous tuberculosis history were found to independently correlate with an elevated risk of squamous/small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma for male patients. However, there was little difference in the effect of these risk factors except smoking. The use of fume extractors in the kitchen, and the habit of waiting to fry after the fumes were emitted, separately explained the majority of the attributable fraction of female squamous/small cell carcinoma (28.2%) and adenocarcinoma (47.7%). With the exception of a kitchen with fume extractors and a clinical history of tuberculosis, the environmental causal factors of lung cancer were heterogeneous between these two histologic cell groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggested that the causal factors of lung cancer might be specific for the type of tumor concerned. The gender-specific risk factors of lung cancer could partly explain the difference in cell-type distribution between men and women.

PMID:
11456224
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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