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J Cardiovasc Risk. 2001 Jun;8(3):133-7.

Coronary calcification and cardiac events after percutaneous intervention in dialysis patients.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have described increased vascular calcification in renal dialysis patients. The clinical significance of this finding with respect to outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention in this population is unknown.

METHODS:

We analysed a prospective interventional database at a single tertiary center and identified 41 dialysis patients who underwent coronary angioplasty. All studies were reviewed for the presence of coronary calcium in the target and reference vessels and compared with respect to baseline clinical factors and cardiovascular outcomes.

RESULTS:

The mean ages for those with and without coronary calcification were 63.6 +/- 11.0 and 67.3 +/- 11.0, respectively, P = 0.30. The groups were similar in years on dialysis, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and measures of calcium and phosphate balance. The total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides were 162.5 +/- 42.3 and 202.0 +/- 54.5, P = 0.02; 94.9 +/- 39.6 and 121.2 +/- 48.1, P = 0.18; 39.3 +/- 12.4 and 47.3 +/- 12.2, P = 0.15; 157.4 +/- 100.4 and 181.3 +/- 187.4, P = 0.15, for those with and without calcification, respectively. The composite of target vessel revascularization, myocardial infarction, or death was 47.4% and 77.3% for those with and without calcification, respectively, P = 0.06. The Cox proportional hazards model, controlling for years on dialysis, showed a significant, event-free survival in those with coronary calcium seen fluoroscopically, P = 0.05.

CONCLUSIONS:

In dialysis patients, coronary calcification identified in the target or reference vessels is associated with lower total cholesterol and favourable interventional outcomes.

PMID:
11455844
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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