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Arq Bras Cardiol. 2001 Jun;76(6):497-510.

Trends in death from circulatory diseases in Brazil between 1979 and 1996.

[Article in English, Portuguese]

Author information

1
Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, 05403-000, Brazil. corantonio@incor.usp.br

Erratum in

  • Arq Bras Cardiol 2001 Aug;77(2):204.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the trends in mortality due to circulatory diseases in men and women aged > or =30 years in Brazil from 1979 to 1996.

METHODS:

We analyzed population count data obtained from the IBGE Foundation and mortality data obtained from the System of Information on Mortality of the DATASUS of the Ministry of Health.

RESULTS:

Circulatory diseases, ischemic heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease were the major causes of death in men and women in Brazil. The standardized age coefficient for circulatory disease in men aged > or =30 years ranged from 620 to 506 deaths/100,000 inhabitants and in women from 483 to 383 deaths/100,000 inhabitants for the years 1979 and 1996, respectively. In men, the mean coefficient for the period was 586.25 deaths with a significant trend towards a decrease (P<0.001) and a decline of 8.25 deaths/year. In women, the mean coefficient for the period was 439.58 deaths, a significant trend towards a decrease (P<0.001) and a rate of decline of 7.53 deaths/year. The same significant trend towards a decrease in death (P<0.001) was observed for ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Risk of death from these causes was always higher for men of any age group (P<0.001). Cerebrovascular disease was the primary cause of death in women.

CONCLUSION:

Although circulatory diseases have been the major cause of mortality in men and women in the Brazilian population, with a greater participation by cerebrovascular diseases, a trend towards a decrease in the risk of death from these causes is being observed.

PMID:
11449295
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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