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Arthroscopy. 2001 Jul;17(6):642-7.

Injuries to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

We present 12 cases of patients with injury to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau. There were 11 male patients and 1 female patient with an average age of 26 years (range, 17 to 44 years). There were 4 cases of posterolateral rotatory instability and 8 cases of straight lateral instability of the knee. The size of the compression fracture was classified into 2 types, small (8 cases) and large (4 cases). Although the mechanism of injury was considered to be hyperextension and varus force, the pattern of cruciate ligament injuries varied from case to case. The following 3 questions should be considered to determine which cruciate ligament is damaged: (1) Was the ipsilateral foot fixed to the ground? (2) Was forward inertia involved? (3) Was there a direct blow to the anteromedial aspect of the tibia or to the femur? Accompanied fractures of the medial tibial plateau were considered to have been compressed by the medial femoral condyle. The size of the accompanying compression fracture varied; 7 of 8 cases with a small-type fracture had posterior cruciate ligament injuries and 3 of 4 cases with a large-type fracture had anterior cruciate ligament injuries. The size of the fracture is determined by which point of the medial tibial plateau touched the medial femoral condyle. We propose that a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau indicates a coexistent posterolateral aspect injury, and that especially a small compression fracture strongly suggests an accompanying posterior cruciate ligament injury, as well.

PMID:
11447554
DOI:
10.1053/jars.2001.22362
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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