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Clin Cardiol. 2001 Jul;24(7):511-5.

N-acetylcysteine improves microcirculatory flow during smoking: new effects of an old drug with possible benefits for smokers.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cigarette smoking provokes marked acute changes in the microcirculatory vasculature, including a reduced blood flow velocity. In accordance with the hypothesis that the reduced blood flow is due to an imbalance between pro-oxidants and oxidants, we recently showed that most of the reduction could be reversed by a high dose of vitamin C.

HYPOTHESIS:

In the present work we tested the hypothesis that N-acetylcysteine, a mucolyticum and an antioxidant, may have an effect on the smoking-induced changes observed by vital capillary microscopy of the nailfold.

METHODS:

In all, 37 healthy volunteers of both genders and with varied smoking habits were treated with N-acetylcysteine 200 mg t.i.d. for 2 weeks. In vivo investigation of the microcirculation by capillaroscopy was performed before and after treatment.

RESULTS:

Treatment with N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced the smoking-induced relative decrease in capillary blood flow velocity in a group of volunteers with varied smoking habits (p = 0.0016). The preventive effect was clearly significant in smokers (p = 0.003).

CONCLUSION:

Treatment with N-acetylcysteine has a positive impact on microcirculatory flow during smoking, particularly in habitual smokers.

PMID:
11444642
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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