Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2001 Jul 15;391(2):171-9.

RLIP76 is the major ATP-dependent transporter of glutathione-conjugates and doxorubicin in human erythrocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Human Biological Chemistry and Genetics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA.

Abstract

We have recently demonstrated that RLIP76, a Ral-binding GTPase activating protein mediates ATP-dependent transport of glutathione (GSH) conjugates of electrophiles (GS-E) as well as doxorubicin (DOX), and that it is identical with DNP-SG ATPase, a GS-E transporter previously characterized by us in erythrocyte membranes (Awasthi et al. Biochemistry 39, 9327-9334). Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) belonging to the family of the ABC-transporters has also been suggested to be a GS-E transporter in human erythrocytes. Using immunological approaches, the present studies were designed to elucidate the relative contributions of RLIP76, MRP1, and P-glycoprotein (Pgp), in the ATP-dependent transport of GS-E and DOX in human erythrocytes. In Western blot analyses using antibodies against RLIP76, a strong expression of RLIP76 was observed in erythrocytes. Immunohistochemical studies using a fluorescent probe showed association of RLIP76 with erythrocyte membrane, which was consistent with its transport function. Neither MRP1 nor Pgp were detected in erythrocytes when the antibodies against MRP1 or Pgp were used. In erythrocyte inside-out vesicles (IOVs) coated with antibodies against RLIP76, a dose-dependent inhibition of the ATP-dependent transport of DOX and GS-E, including S-(dinitrophenyl)glutathione (DNP-SG), leukotriene C(4), and the GSH conjugate of 4-hydroxynonenal, was observed with a maximal inhibition of about 70%. On the contrary, in the IOVs coated with the antibodies against MRP1 or Pgp no significant inhibition of the ATP-dependent transport of these compounds was observed. These findings suggest that RLIP76 is the major ATP-dependent transporter of GS-E and DOX in human erythrocytes.

PMID:
11437348
DOI:
10.1006/abbi.2001.2395
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center