Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2001 Apr;19(4):156-60.

[Occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens in health care workers].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital J.M. Morales Meseguer, Murcia. rblazquezg@medynet.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the rate of occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens in different occupations of health care workers. To analyze the characteristics and outcome of the occupational exposure.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We have evaluate occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens reported by health care workers during 1996-1999. The following data were collected: characteristics of the workers, type of occupational exposure, immunity status of the exposed worker, infectivity of the source patient and follow up serologic testing of the worker.

RESULTS:

A total of 407 occupational exposures were reported. The highest rate of occupational exposure was found among nurses (61.6%). Needlestick accident was the most often occupational exposure reported (84.5%). Mucosal exposures with accidental splashes were reported in 15.2% of cases. In 14.5% of these accidents workers were at risk for occupational transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Among the different occupations of health care workers, the rate of exposures with a source infected patient was higher in medical staffs (28.3%) than nurses (13.9%) The rate of exposures with a source infected patient was higher in accidental splashes than in percutaneous exposures (33.8% vs 13.3%), besides in none of the accidental splashes, employees had used appropriate barrier precautions. There were no cases of transmission of occupational blood-borne infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although nurses are the health care workers with highest rates of occupational exposures, medical staffs are the most often occupationally exposed to a source infected patient. Universal barrier precautions are no appropriately used in most of the occupational accidents, specially in those involving mucosal exposures.

PMID:
11428345
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center