Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatr Res. 2001 Jul;50(1):34-43.

Alveolar recruitment promotes homogeneous surfactant distribution in a piglet model of lung injury.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Medical School, 79106 Freiburg, Germany. m.krause@pediatrics.uni-kiel.de

Abstract

Uneven distribution of exogenous surfactant contributes to a poor clinical response in animal models of respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar recruitment at the time of surfactant administration may lead to more homogeneous distribution within the lungs and result in a superior clinical response. To investigate the effects of three different volume recruitment maneuvers on gas exchange, lung function, and homogeneity of surfactant distribution, we studied 35 newborn piglets made surfactant deficient by repeated airway lavage with warm saline. Volume recruitment was achieved by either a temporal increase in tidal volume or an increase in end-expiratory pressure during surfactant administration, yielding an increase in dynamic compliance of the respiratory system of 77% in the first group and an increase in functional residual capacity of 108% in the second group. A third group of piglets (all n = 7) received a combination of both volume recruitment maneuvers, with increases in dynamic compliance of the respiratory system of 100% and in functional residual capacity of 192%. Those animals subjected to increased tidal volume showed an improved surfactant response in terms of oxygenation, ventilation, lung volumes, lung mechanics, and homogeneity of surfactant distribution. Increased end-expiratory volume augmented the surfactant effect only to some extent. The combination of both volume recruitment maneuvers, however, needed lung volumes beyond total lung capacity (approximately 56 mL/kg), thus probably inducing early sequelae of ventilator-induced lung injury. We conclude that volume recruitment by means of increased tidal volumes at the time of surfactant administration leads to a superior surfactant effect owing to more homogeneous surfactant distribution within a collapsed lung.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Support Center