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Mol Neurobiol. 2000 Aug-Dec;22(1-3):11-20.

Amygdala-hippocampus dynamic interaction in relation to memory.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Haifa University, Israel. gal.r-1@psy.haifa.ac.il

Abstract

Typically the term "memory" refers to the ability to consciously remember past experiences or previously learned information. This kind of memory is considered to be dependent upon the hippocampal system. However, our emotional state seems to considerably affect the way in which we retain information and the accuracy with which the retention occurs. The amygdala is the most notably involved brain structure in emotional responses and the formation of emotional memories. In this review we describe a system, composed of the amygdala and the hippocampus, that acts synergistically to form long-term memories of significantly emotional events. These brain structures are activated following an emotional event and cross-talk with each other in the process of consolidation. This dual activation of the amygdala and the hippocampus and the dynamics between them may be what gives emotionally based memories their uniqueness.

PMID:
11414274
DOI:
10.1385/MN:22:1-3:011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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