Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;11(5):320-7.

A case-control study of physical activity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). the San Luis Valley Diabetes Study.

Author information

Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 80262, USA.



The purpose of this study was to examine the association between physical activity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).


We conducted a population-based case-control study in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white men and women, ages 20-74. A total of 167 cases with NIDDM and 1100 controls with normal glucose tolerance were included. All subjects completed an oral glucose tolerance test.


Persons with recently diagnosed NIDDM reported significantly lower levels of physical activity than control subjects. For total metabolic units, the odds ratio for subjects in the highest tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile was 0.60 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.37-0.98) after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and family history of diabetes. The adjusted odds ratio for persons reporting high levels of vigorous activity (at least three times per week for 20 minutes) was also less than 1, but was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.47-1.14). Similar adjusted odds ratios were observed for high versus low levels of self-assessed work activity (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.34-0.74) and leisure time physical activity (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.44-0.90). Further adjustments for body mass index attenuated the strength of the association between physical activity and NIDDM. This is consistent with the hypothesis that obesity is one consequence of physical inactivity that puts individuals at increased risk for NIDDM. The association of physical activity and NIDDM was stronger in Hispanic than in non-Hispanic white subjects, although this difference was not statistically significant.


High levels of physical activity are associated with lower odds of NIDDM and this relationship may be stronger in Hispanic subjects.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center