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Am J Hematol. 2001 Jul;67(3):157-62.

Extracellular accumulation of bioactive substances during preparation and storage of various platelet concentrates.

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1
Surgical Immunology Laboratory, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Side effects of platelet transfusion may be associated with infusion of bioactive substances. We therefore studied extracellular accumulation of histamine, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin (IL)-6 during preparation and storage of various platelet concentrates.

METHODS:

Twenty buffy-coat-derived platelet pools (BCPC) were prepared and stored in platelet additive solutions (PAS). Twelve apheresis platelet (APC) units were prepared using the COBE Spectra LRS, and 14 were prepared using the Fenwal Amicus Separator. After preparation half of the content was drawn from each APC unit. The normal ranges of the substances were determined in plasma from all donors, and the extracellular concentrations of the substances were determined in supernatants collected on days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 of storage from all platelet preparations.

RESULTS:

The platelet counts were not significantly different in BCPC units and APC units. The BCPC units had a significantly higher white cell count than the APC units (P < 0.0001), but the count was significantly higher in the Amicus APC units than in the COBE APC units (P < 0.0001). The extracellular histamine concentration was significantly (P < 0.001) increased in BCPC units after preparation and without further increase during storage, while there was no accumulation of histamine in APC units. After preparation the PAI-1 concentration was significantly (P < 0.02) higher in BCPC units than in APC units, but during storage PAI-1 increased significantly (P < 0.05) more in APC units than in BCPC units. Similarly, VEGF concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in BCPC units than in APC units after preparation. During storage, however, VEGF increased more in BCPC units compared with COBE Spectra APC units (P < 0.05), but compared with Amicus Separator APC units only for the first 3 days of storage. At days 5 and 7 of storage the VEGF concentration was significantly higher in the Amicus APC units than in the COBE APC units (P < 0.05). IL-6 was not detectable in any of the concentrates after preparation or during storage.

CONCLUSION:

Platelet concentrates prepared by the apheresis method may contain less white cell derived bioactive substances than platelet concentrates prepared by the buffy-coat method. However, a substantial storage time dependent platelet derived bioactive substance accumulation takes place in all platelet concentrates tested, presumably due to platelet disintegration.

PMID:
11391711
DOI:
10.1002/ajh.1099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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