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Circulation. 2001 Jun 5;103(22):2694-8.

Astroglial protein S-100 is an early and sensitive marker of hypoxic brain damage and outcome after cardiac arrest in humans.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The results of early conventional tests do not correlate with cerebral outcome after cardiac arrest. We investigated the serum levels of astroglial protein S-100 as an early marker of brain damage and outcome after cardiac arrest.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In 66 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation after nontraumatic cardiac arrest, blood samples for the evaluation of S-100 were drawn immediately after and 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes; 2, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours; and 7 days after initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Moreover, the serum levels of neuron-specific enolase were determined between 2 hours and 7 days. If patients survived for >48 hours, brain damage was assessed by a combination of neurological, cranial CT, and electrophysiological examinations. Overall, 343 blood samples were taken for the determination of S-100. Maximum S-100 levels within 2 hours after cardiac arrest were significantly higher in patients with documented brain damage (survivors and nonsurvivors, 3.70+/-0.77 microg/L) than in patients without brain damage (0.90+/-0.29 microg/L). Significant differences between these 2 groups were observed from 30 minutes until 7 days after cardiac arrest. In addition, the positive predictive value of the S-100 test at 24 hours for fatal outcome within 14 days was 87%, and the negative predictive value was 100% (P<0.001). With regard to neuron-specific enolase, significant differences between patients with documented brain damage and those with no brain damage were found at 24, 48, and 72 hours and 7 days.

CONCLUSIONS:

Astroglial protein S-100 is an early and sensitive marker of hypoxic brain damage and short-term outcome after cardiac arrest in humans.

PMID:
11390339
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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