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Kidney Int. 2001 Jun;59(6):2126-33.

Association of parvovirus B19 infection with idiopathic collapsing glomerulopathy.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Transplant Immunology, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. amoudgil@cnmc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG), a disorder with severe glomerular and tubular involvement, occurs either as an idiopathic lesion or in some patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection known as HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). We previously reported a renal transplant recipient with de novo CG and red cell aplasia in association with persistent parvovirus B19 (PVB19) infection. This prompted us to look for an association between PVB19 infection and CG.

METHODS:

DNA from archived biopsies of patients with CG was analyzed for PVB19 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results were compared with HIVAN, idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and controls. In situ hybridization (ISH) was done to localize PVB19 in renal biopsies. Peripheral blood specimens of patients with CG, HIV infection, healthy controls, and randomly selected hospitalized patients (sick controls) were also analyzed for PVB19.

RESULTS:

PVB19 DNA was detected in renal biopsies of 18 out of 23 (78.3%) patients with CG, 3 out of 19 (15.8%) with HIVAN, 6 out of 27 (22.2%) with FSGS, and 7 out of 27 (25.9%) controls (P < 0.01, CG vs. HIVAN, FSGS, and controls). PVB19 was detected in peripheral blood of 7 out of 8 (87.5%) CG patients, 3 out of 22 (13.6%) with HIV infection, 4 out of 133 (3%) healthy controls, and 2 out of 50 (4%) sick controls (P < 0.001, CG vs. HIV infected, healthy, and sick controls). PVB19 was identified in glomerular parietal and visceral epithelial and tubular cells by ISH.

CONCLUSIONS:

The significantly higher prevalence of PVB19 DNA in renal biopsies and peripheral blood of CG patients suggests a specific association between PVB19 infection and CG. In susceptible individuals, renal epithelial cell infection with PVB19 may induce CG.

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