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Trends Mol Med. 2001 Jun;7(6):252-8.

Protective autoimmunity: regulation and prospects for vaccination after brain and spinal cord injuries.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot, Israel. michal.schwartz@weizmann.ac.il

Abstract

Neuronal degeneration after traumatic injury to the central nervous system (CNS) can be reduced by active immunization or passive transfer of T cells against CNS-associated myelin antigens. We propose that a protective autoimmunity is evoked by CNS insult when non-immunological local protective mechanisms cannot adequately buffer the injury-induced toxicity. The ability of a particular strain to develop a protective autoimmune response appears to be inversely related to its susceptibility to autoimmune disease. We also propose that vaccination with specific CNS-derived'safe' (non-pathogenic) peptides after traumatic CNS insult, and possibly at any stage of chronic neurodegenerative disease, can be used to boost the protective autoimmunity and thereby to reduce further injury-induced damage. Such therapeutic vaccination ensures that the augmented beneficial autoimmunity will be free of accompanying disease.

PMID:
11378514
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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