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Gene. 2001 May 2;268(1-2):31-9.

Chromosomal location of murine disabled-2 gene and structural comparison with its human ortholog.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

Disabled-2 (Dab2) is one of the two mammalian orthologs of the Drosophila Disabled. The three spliced forms, p96, p93, and p67 of murine Dab2 cDNAs were first isolated as phosphoproteins functioning in the macrophage CSF-1 signal transduction pathway. Subsequently, the involvement of Dab2 in ovarian cancer development has been investigated: Dab2 expression is lost or greatly diminished in breast and ovarian cancers, and gene deletions have been found. Regulation of Disabled-2 expression is also found to be important in development and physiological functions. Structural information of the murine Dab2 gene is essential for studies of transcription regulation and gene function in mouse models. In this study, the mouse Dab2 gene coding sequence was identified and sequenced from three lambda phage clones containing the gene. Two BAC clones of mouse genomic DNA were also used to identify the sequences of the non-coding first exon and promoter. The first exon is separated from the second exon by a large (15 kb) intron. The mouse gene is about 40 kb in size and consists of 15 exons, producing a 3.6 kb message. The translation initiation site resides in the middle of the second exon. The mouse Dab2 gene structure is very similar to that of its human ortholog in exon/intron sizes and promoter sequences. The chromosomal localization of mouse Dab2 was mapped by FISH to chromosome 15A2, a site of syntax with the human 5p12 where human Dab2 gene resides. The information on the mouse Dab2 gene structure and promoter will be invaluable in studies of the involvement of Dab2 gene in cancer, expression, physiological function, and development in mouse models.

PMID:
11368898
DOI:
10.1016/s0378-1119(01)00401-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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