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Dis Colon Rectum. 2001 May;44(5):690-8.

High prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and squamous-cell carcinoma in men who have sex with men as seen in a surgical practice.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions are probable invasive anal squamous-cell cancer precursors, and although unproved, treatment of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions may prevent progression to anal squamous-cell cancer. Men who have sex with men are often treated for benign anorectal disorders without consideration given to the possibility of concurrent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or anal squamous-cell cancer. We determined the prevalence of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and anal squamous-cell cancer in an urban surgical practice of men who have sex with men referred for treatment of anal condyloma and other benign noncondylomatous anal disorders.

METHODS:

One hundred thirty-one HIV-positive and 69 HIV-negative men who have sex with men referred for surgical treatment of presumed benign anorectal disease were evaluated by anal cytology, high-resolution anoscopy, and biopsy. Anal cytology and histology were reported with a modified Bethesda classification.

RESULTS:

One hundred fifty-seven patients (79 percent) were referred for condyloma, 4 (2 percent) for anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) diagnosed by primary care providers, and 39 (19 percent) for other benign anorectal disorders. One hundred forty-three patients (93 percent) had abnormal anal cytology, with 107 (54 percent) having high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions on cytology. Biopsy results revealed 120 patients (60.0 percent) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and 5 patients (3 percent) with invasive squamous-cell carcinoma. Four of five men with anal squamous-cell cancer were HIV positive. Fourteen men (36 percent) who have sex with men referred for noncondylomatous benign anal disorders had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and three (8 percent) had anal squamous-cell cancer. High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and anal squamous-cell cancer were seen most often at the squamocolumnar junction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Men who have sex with men referred for treatment of either condyloma or noncondylomatous benign anorectal disease had a high prevalence of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and anal squamous-cell cancer. All men who have sex with men referred for treatment of benign anorectal disease should have high-resolution anoscopy and aggressive biopsy of all abnormal areas. Treatment of external lesions alone could miss high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or anal squamous-cell cancer.

PMID:
11357031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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