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J Sports Sci. 2001 May;19(5):341-7.

Severity and cost of injuries in amateur rugby league: a case study.

Author information

1
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Griffith University Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. t.gabbett@mailbox.gu.edu

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the severity and cost of injuries in amateur rugby league. Seventy-two amateur rugby league players aged 28 +/- 6 years (mean +/- s) were surveyed at the end of a competitive season. An injury was defined as any pain, disability or injury that occurred as a result of a competition game which caused the player to miss subsequent games. Injuries were classified as minor (one game missed), moderate (two to four games missed) and major (five or more games missed). Of the 72 questionnaires distributed, 34 (47.2%) were returned. Twenty respondents (58.8%) sustained an injury that resulted in one or more missed games. Eight injured players (40.0%) missed five or more training sessions, six of whom (30%) missed five or more games as a result of the injury. The median time lost from employment or study for all injured players was 2 days per playing injury. The respective median direct (e.g. medical expenses) and indirect (e.g. wages lost) costs associated with the injury were 28.29 pounds and 77.04 pound per playing injury. A considerable proportion of injuries sustained in the present sample of amateur rugby league players were major, resulting in a loss of training, playing and employment or study time, and these injuries were associated with significant direct and indirect economic costs. Further studies, using a larger sample, would complement the present findings in establishing the severity and cost of amateur rugby league injuries. These results suggest that prevention strategies are required to reduce the severity and cost of amateur rugby league injuries.

PMID:
11354613
DOI:
10.1080/02640410152006117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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