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J Neurosurg. 2001 May;94(5):733-9.

Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Rouen University Hospital, France. Francois.Proust@chu-rouen.fr

Abstract

OBJECT:

The exceptional pediatric aneurysm can be distinguished from its adult counterpart by its location and size; however, patient outcomes remain difficult to evaluate based on the published literature.

METHODS:

Twenty-two children, all consecutively treated in three neurosurgery departments, were included in this study. Each patient's preoperative status was determined according to the Hunt and Hess classification. Routine computerized tomography scanning and angiography were performed in all children on the 10th postoperative day. Each patient's clinical status was evaluated 2 to 10 years postoperatively by applying the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Twenty-one children presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and one child harbored an asymptomatic giant aneurysm. Thirteen patients were in good preoperative grade (Hunt and Hess Grades I to III) and eight in poor preoperative grade (Hunt and Hess Grade IV or V). The symptomatic aneurysms were located on the internal carotid artery bifurcation (36.4%); middle cerebral artery (36.4%), half of which were found on the distal portion; anterior communicating artery (18.2%); and within the vertebrobasilar system (9.1%). A giant aneurysm was observed in 14% of patients. Overall outcome was favorable (GOS Score 5) in 14 children (63.6%) and death occurred in five (22.7%). Causes of unfavorable outcome included the initial SAH in four children, a complication in procedure in three children, and edema in one child.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric aneurysms have a specific distribution unlike that of aneurysms in the adult population. The incidence of giant aneurysms and outcomes were similar to those in the adult population. The major cause of poor outcome was the initial SAH, in particular, the high proportion of rebleeding possibly due to a delay in diagnosis.

PMID:
11354404
DOI:
10.3171/jns.2001.94.5.0733
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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