Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001 Apr;154(4):420-8.

Rewarding and locomotor-activating effects of direct dopamine receptor agonists are augmented by chronic food restriction in rats.

Author information

1
Millhauser Laboratories, Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA. kc16@nyu.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Previous studies indicate that chronic food restriction augments the rewarding and motor-activating effects of diverse drugs of abuse. The drugs that have so far proved susceptible to the augmenting effect of food restriction all increase synaptic concentrations of dopamine (DA). It is not known whether behavioral effects of selective, direct DA receptor agonists are also subject to the augmenting effect of food restriction.

OBJECTIVES:

The first objective of this study was to investigate whether the rewarding and locomotor-activating effects of the D1 agonist, A77636, and the D2 agonist, quinpirole are augmented by chronic food restriction. The second purpose was to investigate whether the augmented rewarding and locomotor-activating effects of d-amphetamine in food-restricted rats are reversed by the D1 antagonist, SCH23390.

METHODS:

Rewarding effects of drugs were measured in terms of their ability to lower the threshold for lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation (LHSS) using a rate-frequency method. Locomotor-activating effects were measured in terms of the number of midline crossings exhibited by rats in a shuttle apparatus.

RESULTS:

A77636 (1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a greater threshold-lowering effect in food-restricted than ad libitum fed rats but produced variable effects on locomotor activity with no difference between groups. Quinpirole (0.2 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a marginally greater threshold-lowering effect in food-restricted rats and a dramatic locomotor response that was exclusive to food-restricted rats. The D1 antagonist, SCH23390, at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg (i.p.), had no effect on the lowering of LHSS threshold by amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) in ad libitum fed rats but blocked the augmentation otherwise observed in food-restricted rats. SCH23390, at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg, had no effect on locomotor activity induced by amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) in ad libitum fed rats but blocked the augmentation otherwise observed in food-restricted rats.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate that the augmentation of reward by food restriction extends to drugs that bypass the DA terminal and act postsynaptically. When taken together with prior immunohistochemical and behavioral findings, these results suggest that food restriction may increase the "enabling" effect of the D1 receptor on DA-mediated behaviors.

PMID:
11349397
DOI:
10.1007/s002130000674
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center