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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 May 8;98(10):5446-51.

The evolutionary impact of invasive species.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA. hmooney@jasper.stanford.edu

Abstract

Since the Age of Exploration began, there has been a drastic breaching of biogeographic barriers that previously had isolated the continental biotas for millions of years. We explore the nature of these recent biotic exchanges and their consequences on evolutionary processes. The direct evidence of evolutionary consequences of the biotic rearrangements is of variable quality, but the results of trajectories are becoming clear as the number of studies increases. There are examples of invasive species altering the evolutionary pathway of native species by competitive exclusion, niche displacement, hybridization, introgression, predation, and ultimately extinction. Invaders themselves evolve in response to their interactions with natives, as well as in response to the new abiotic environment. Flexibility in behavior, and mutualistic interactions, can aid in the success of invaders in their new environment.

PMID:
11344292
PMCID:
PMC33232
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.091093398
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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