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J Infect Dis. 2001 Jun 1;183(11):1662-8. Epub 2001 Apr 27.

Early human infection with Onchocerca volvulus is associated with an enhanced parasite-specific cellular immune response.

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1
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. pc102d@hotmail.com

Abstract

The immune response after early exposure to or infection with Onchocerca volvulus was investigated in an autochthonous focus caused by the migration of infected persons to a previously unaffected area in Ecuador. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferative and cytokine responses (interferon [IFN]-gamma and interleukin [IL]-5) to filarial antigens were measured in 14 subjects with serologic evidence of exposure and in 7 subjects with evidence of dermal microfilarial DNA and were compared with responses in 43 subjects with chronic O. volvulus infections. PBMC proliferative and cytokine responses (IFN-gamma and IL-5) to parasite antigens were elevated in the early exposure/infection group, compared with those in the chronic infection group. Addition of an IL-10-neutralizing antibody to filaria antigen-stimulated cultures resulted in significantly elevated proliferative responses in the chronic infection group. The findings suggest that early exposure and early parasite patency are associated with a vigorous cellular response, but, as infections become chronic, the cellular response becomes down-regulated, partly through an IL-10-dependent mechanism.

PMID:
11343216
DOI:
10.1086/320709
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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