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Structure. 2001 Jan 10;9(1):65-71.

Crystal structure of phosphoserine phosphatase from Methanococcus jannaschii, a hyperthermophile, at 1.8 A resolution.

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1
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, 94720, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

D-Serine is a co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, a major neurotransmitter receptor family in mammalian nervous systems. D-Serine is converted from L-serine, 90% of which is the product of the enzyme phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). PSP from M. jannaschii (MJ) shares significant sequence homology with human PSP. PSPs and P-type ATPases are members of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like hydrolase family, and all members share three conserved sequence motifs. PSP and P-type ATPases utilize a common mechanism that involves Mg(2+)-dependent phosphorylation and autodephosphorylation at an aspartyl side chain in the active site. The strong resemblance in sequence and mechanism implies structural similarity among these enzymes.

RESULTS:

The PSP crystal structure resembles the NAD(P) binding Rossmann fold with a large insertion of a four-helix-bundle domain and a beta hairpin. Three known conserved sequence motifs are arranged next to each other in space and outline the active site. A phosphate and a magnesium ion are bound to the active site. The active site is within a closed environment between the core alpha/beta domain and the four-helix-bundle domain.

CONCLUSIONS:

The crystal structure of MJ PSP was determined at 1.8 A resolution. Critical residues were assigned based on the active site structure and ligand binding geometry. The PSP structure is in a closed conformation that may resemble the phosphoserine bound state or the state after autodephosphorylation. Compared to a P-type ATPase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) structure, which is in an open state, this PSP structure appears also to be a good model for the closed conformation of P-type ATPase.

PMID:
11342136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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