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FUNCTION AND MECHANISM OF ORGANIC ANION EXUDATION FROM PLANT ROOTS.

Author information

1
CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia; e-mail: p.ryan@pi.csiro.au; e.delhaize@pi.csiro.au, School of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2UW, United Kingdom; e-mail: d.jones@bangor.ac.uk

Abstract

The rhizosphere is the zone of soil immediately surrounding plant roots that is modified by root activity. In this critical zone, plants perceive and respond to their environment. As a consequence of normal growth and development, a large range of organic and inorganic substances are exchanged between the root and soil, which inevitably leads to changes in the biochemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere. Plants also modify their rhizosphere in response to certain environmental signals and stresses. Organic anions are commonly detected in this region, and their exudation from plant roots has now been associated with nutrient deficiencies and inorganic ion stresses. This review summarizes recent developments in the understanding of the function, mechanism, and regulation of organic anion exudation from roots. The benefits that plants derive from the presence of organic anions in the rhizosphere are described and the potential for biotechnology to increase organic anion exudation is highlighted.

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